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Hawaii has weather, Ohio has climate

15 Dec 2021 | News Roundup

Just as the ghouls were out in force two weeks ago blaming BC floods on climate change despite the contrary evidence and the IPCC’s reluctance to make such claims, so also they rushed to blame this week’s devastating Ohio tornadoes on warming. Including President Biden saying “the fact is that we all know everything is more intense when the climate is warming – everything. And, obviously, it has some impact here…” and NBC, which opine-reported that “Meteorologists have said climate change most likely made the tornado outbreak worse”. Never mind that tornadoes need unusually cold air to get going (which is why they are virtually non-existent in the tropics), or that the IPCC has only low confidence in any trends in total US tornado events, or that the long term trend in severe tornadoes is downward, not upward, as is the trend in normalized tornado damage. Everything bad is climate. Except, that is, recent flooding in Hawaii accompanied by heavy rain, blizzard warnings and a foot of snow in the mountains. Instead, the New York Times assures us, “It’s Not That Weird”. See, cold is just weather.

In Hawaii, we didn’t even get talk of “atmospheric rivers”. Instead NBC, in a climate-free piece, explained that “The weather system responsible for all that rain is a Kona Low, a seasonal cyclone that pulls deep tropical moisture over Hawaii.” And in another, that “The National Weather Service’s prediction center said it’s common to see snow above 11,000 feet in Hawaii. The state’s third-tallest peak, Haleakala, which stands at just over 10,000 feet, only records snow every two to three years.” So what happened to climate change? Well, “Parts of Alaska’s Yukon Delta are also expected to see whiteout conditions with 70 mph winds, blowing snow and a light accumulation of new snowfall, the National Weather Service said. More winter weather is expected in the lower 48 this weekend, with forecasters calling for a swath of heavy snowfall across the Upper Midwest and Great Lakes.” Egad. What? Winter weather in early December in much of the United States? And here we thought children wouldn’t know what snow was, all storms were climate driven and relentless heat was closing in. (Mind you AccuWeather in reporting that “Record-shattering cold has gripped Alaska and refuses to let go” immediately added “Much of the U.S. has been experiencing a fall heat wave” lest people get the wrong idea.)

From Paul Homewood we also hear that the severe flooding of November 1951 hit the Rhone and Po valleys as well as England. And if you didn’t hear it, if you didn’t hear of severe flooding in November 1951 at all and somehow had the idea that flooding is a new thing due to climate breakdown, well, you didn’t get that one from us.

Outside the window, now firmly closed where we live against the freezing cold, it’s almost as though weather is variable. (Like Arctic sea ice.) As Tony Heller recently observed, “It’s been almost 14 years since the Australian Bureau of Meteorology and the Sydney Morning Herald announced the Australian permanent drought.” Specifically on January 4 2008, though a couple of years later it rained so hard it supposedly lowered global sea levels. Despite which the experts again predicted permanent drought in 2020, and linked it to the wildfires. Instead of which by March 2021 southeast Australia saw more flooding, which lingered. So guess what? “Catastrophic fires and devastating floods are part of Australia’s harsh new climate reality.” Yup. That’s Michael Mann talking. Or raving, about “a dystopian future that alternates between Mad Max and Waterworld.”

Heller also quoted a poem about “A land of sweeping plains, Of ragged mountain ranges, Of droughts and flooding rains” which rather calls to mind Ray Conlogue’s jibe in Impossible Nation about the Canada First movement in which “Torrents of terrible verse by any number of writers described the rocks, the rivers, the twisted pines, the vaulting mountains.” Not least because they are roughly contemporaneous; Dorothy Mackellar’s “My Country” celebrating Australia’s “beauty and her terror” was written in 1908, a time perhaps of poetic but not of climate emergency.

We won’t recap the whole Heller video. But it does mention that disastrous Australian floods in 1974 were blamed on, wait for it, climate change, specifically the coming ice age; he quotes a news story that leads with “Worldwide and rapid trends towards a mini Ice Age are emerging from the first long term analyses of satellite weather pictures”. But we will thank a viewer for alerting us to the fact that Australia’s 1974-75 bushfire season saw 117 million hectares burn, as against just 19 million in climate-ravaged 2020-21, while 1850-51 saw at least 5 million hectares go up in smoke.

Buoyed by such data, we are moved to warn you to beware the flood of rubbish claims caused by climate change.

4 comments on “Hawaii has weather, Ohio has climate”

  1. IN REGARDS TO THE TORNADO ACTIVITY IN KENTUCKY, BACK IN THE FALL OF 2020WHEN HURRICANES WERE
    MORE ACTIVE, I NOTICED THERE WERE NO REPORTS OF TORNADOES. THE MWS REPORTED 650 FEWER TORNADOES
    IN 2020 THAN IN 2019. WHY DIDN'T WE HEAR MORE ABOUT THIS IN 2020?

  2. Just remember the fundamental law of climate change. If it's nice, it's weather. If it's nasty, it's climate change.

  3. When I first read Ayn Rand's 'Atlas Shrugged' back in the early 60's, I never could have dreamed that I would someday live in an even worse dystopia than the fictional one she created. These days, a bastard quotation keeps running through my thoughts. 'Where is John Galt?'

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